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TOPIC: Health of Swapping tanks

Health of Swapping tanks 3 months 3 days ago #70353

  • Scott49
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so I made video to show you the sizes... sorry for shit quality can't expect much from iPhone

the smallest guy (HUNTER) is always happy to see me


3 little O's
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Health of Swapping tanks 3 months 3 days ago #70354

  • blackcougar
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95 gallon oscar tank at my office..

So three oscars in a 95 gallon tank is not big enough. You need a minimum 150 gallon if not 200 gallons to handle the bioload.

90 gallon is a good size for one oscar and a servum, or some silver dollars or maybe a jack dampsey or a a pair of fire mouths.

You have some decisions to make.
65 gallon
2 yellow tail aceis
1 male cobue peacock
3 female cobue peacocks
1 male blood dragon
2 Synodontis lucipinnis

5.5 Gallon
Delta tail betta

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Health of Swapping tanks 3 months 3 days ago #70355

  • Scott49
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I understand your concern but my bio load is fine tank is always clean when they actually grow then ill sort it out then but for now they are fine
3 little O's
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Health of Swapping tanks 3 months 3 days ago #70356

  • blackcougar
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its not just the bioload you have to be concerned about. The reason no one ever keeps three Oscars in the same tank is if two of them decide to pair off the third one will be in trouble.

Short term for it working is between 16 to 24 months. When the Oscars reach full maturity which happens during the second year. Things can and will dramatically change. It's like someone throwing a switch on.

One minute they're nice to each other, and the next minute it turns into a blood bath. Or one day one of the Oscars decides he doesn't like tank mates and decide to kill off the other two.

I had a pictus catfish in with mine and it worked for five months. Drifter turned two and the decided he didn't like tank mates and snapped the catfish in half.

Even in a 200 gallon, you have a 50% chance of it working or not.


I hope for their sakes you have a plan in place. If not you will be setting yourself for long term issues and will need to make a decision in the coming months.
65 gallon
2 yellow tail aceis
1 male cobue peacock
3 female cobue peacocks
1 male blood dragon
2 Synodontis lucipinnis

5.5 Gallon
Delta tail betta

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Health of Swapping tanks 3 months 2 days ago #70357

  • Tarheel96
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They are stunted and will never grow large. They may grow larger by a couple inches but that's about it.

Cichlids release a hormone which stunts their growth if water conditions are less than optimal. If there's any ammonia or nitrite in the water or if nitrate is anything other than very low then this hormone will be present in the water. The hormone is removed by large, frequent water changes. These water changes prevent stunted growth even in poor quality water.

This is where the saying 'Fish will grow to the size of the tank' comes from. It's partly true but stunted fish aren't healthy.

I rescued some Jack Dempseys which were/are stunted. They were in a 55 gallon tank with over 40 other JDs between 1.5" and their size: 2.5 - 4". Even if the water were changed every day the hormone level which stunts growth would still be high in a tank with that many fish. At 2 years old, my largest male Jack never got longer than 7" and the other 3 never got beyond 6".
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Health of Swapping tanks 3 months 2 days ago #70359

  • blackcougar
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Tarheel96 wrote:
They are stunted and will never grow large. They may grow larger by a couple inches but that's about it.

Cichlids release a hormone which stunts their growth if water conditions are less than optimal. If there's any ammonia or nitrite in the water or if nitrate is anything other than very low then this hormone will be present in the water. The hormone is removed by large, frequent water changes. These water changes prevent stunted growth even in poor quality water.

This is where the saying 'Fish will grow to the size of the tank' comes from. It's partly true but stunted fish aren't healthy.

I rescued some Jack Dempseys which were/are stunted. They were in a 55 gallon tank with over 40 other JDs between 1.5" and their size: 2.5 - 4". Even if the water were changed every day the hormone level which stunts growth would still be high in a tank with that many fish. At 2 years old, my largest male Jack never got longer than 7" and the other 3 never got beyond 6".

I didn't want to say anything earlier incase I was wrong about them being stunted. It had crossed my mind, because they should've been more then doubled that size by now.

Average growth rate for an Oscar is one to two inches for the first ten months of their lives. They slow down and grow to 12 to 14 inches to age five sometimes bigger if given the right conditions.
65 gallon
2 yellow tail aceis
1 male cobue peacock
3 female cobue peacocks
1 male blood dragon
2 Synodontis lucipinnis

5.5 Gallon
Delta tail betta

The psych meter has gone from sane to insane.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
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