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TOPIC: Tankmate hopeless at this point?

Tankmate hopeless at this point? 3 weeks 5 days ago #69393

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Hey all, haven't posted in a while, but my oscar Pete is I guess a little over 3 years now. He is housed alone in a 75g. He used to be housed with an old lady convict, you can probably see in previous postings of mine from the past. She unfortunately died (of old age) about a year ago. He's been alone ever since. Do you think it would ever be possible to introduce another tankmate at this point? (The convict had been with him since he was smaller than she was and as he grew she kept him in line and would bully him still even when he was full grown and she could probably have fit in his mouth.) I say "He" but I don't actually know the sex.
75 G with built in overflow, 20g sump, with 1 adult oscar (sex unknown) and 1 adult female convict (RIP my sweet old lady).
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Tankmate hopeless at this point? 3 weeks 5 days ago #69394

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A new introduced fish that is in food size what female Amatitlania are is always a gamble.

I would only try it if there are hiding Spots while even if Cons are regulary to fast for Oscars its only an 4 feet tank where the chance of getting pinned down is more likley as in 6 or 6.5 foot between 100 to 240G.

At best would be catfish caves that are open on both sides but only the trying will tell you if it will work.

Personally i would leave him alone in 75G but it's may a try worth for you
We need to stop talking about the people as if they were the crown of creation.
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Tankmate hopeless at this point? 3 weeks 5 days ago #69398

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What do the nitrates run in the Oscar tank immediately prior to a water change? What is your water change schedule?
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Tankmate hopeless at this point? 3 weeks 5 days ago #69399

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beretta96 wrote:
What do the nitrates run in the Oscar tank immediately prior to a water change? What is your water change schedule?


The more bio burden can be overlooked ins case like that. An adult Oscar has like 100 times more body weight as an female convict.
You will not be able to see an significant increase on Nitrate. Regulary you don't need even to feed her while there are enough leftovers from the Oscar.
The main Problem is still the possibility to get eaten or get crewed to death because Oscars are Oscars and there is not alot of footprint and possible hidouts for a fish.
We need to stop talking about the people as if they were the crown of creation.
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Tankmate hopeless at this point? 3 weeks 5 days ago #69400

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toom wrote:
beretta96 wrote:
What do the nitrates run in the Oscar tank immediately prior to a water change? What is your water change schedule?


The more bio burden can be overlooked ins case like that. An adult Oscar has like 100 times more body weight as an female convict.
You will not be able to see an significant increase on Nitrate. Regulary you don't need even to feed her while there are enough leftovers from the Oscar.
The main Problem is still the possibility to get eaten or get crewed to death because Oscars are Oscars and there is not alot of footprint and possible hidouts for a fish.

My thought is if the nitrates are either just right or high then the type of fish to add is immaterial due to the tank not having the capacity to take on additional bioload. However, if the nitrates are low, then the tank has capacity to take on another fish from a bioload perspective. Assuming the tank has the capacity for additional bioload, then the discussion turns to what type of fish to manage aggression while not exceeding bioload maximums - getting eaten is part of the "managing aggression" discussion.
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